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permanent normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia
russia -- what kind of policy she needed to have with russia. >> but rula, let's be fair. sarah palin could see russia from her back yard. i mean -- >> and that's -- >> but he says susan rice doesn't know that much. >> he's the man that picked that woman. you know what? he should reflect -- mccain should reflect about how you should behave when you actually are beaten and defeated. with dignity. and you should actually question yourself about your mistakes, about your choices, and how the country wants you to behave from now on. the country chose barack obama with a large margin. >> twice. >> twice. not once. twice. and maz a message for him, that he needs to actually cooperate with barack obama, not attack him. >> joan, as i said, he questioned what ms. rice, ambassador rice knows. let me explain. ambassador rice, now the u.n. ambassador to the u.n., foreign policy adviser to john kerry, clinton administration '93 to 2001, a rhodes scholar, a ph.d. from oxford university. i mean, as was stated by rula, he didn't question condoleezza rice in 2005, when the whole world was questioning
coming in from russia, switzerland and france under the mantle of the palestinian authorities are going to open the grave this coming week. they're going to take samples and shut the grave again on the same day. it's a very emotional day for palestinians because he is this overarching palestinian figure, but also a very, very interesting and almost exciting forensic case as well, victor. >> we know that the investigative committee held a news conference a short time ago. what more are we learning about how they're moving forward? >> reporter: well, they said they're moving forward in a way that, first of all, they pushed back the date for when the grave was going to be opened. they then went through the motions how all of this is going down. they said there's going to be a very ceremonial opening of the grave, then they're going to take the samples and then arafat is going to be laid to rest again with a religious ceremony and a military ceremony as well. that's sort of the process that's going to go on. what's going to happen is these three forensic teams, the russian, french and swiss
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's the soviet union. she said was that? but it's a big thing back in the late 80s and early 90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which when it was a foregone conclusion, the terrorists and they took us all by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers. never given too much credit. interestingly enough, all the buildings were built by the bin laden construction company and had the bin laden stamps and buildings. how's that for irony? after that, things kind of change. the world trade in their bombing and september 11, we all know what happened that day. i was flying up winning. we came back from the middle east from another rotation in the monday, september 10 was their first day back. the morning of september 11th is actually flying in it come down very, very early. somebody said hey come you got to look at this. remember the key not the first tower building, what morons could hit tower of that size on a clear day? i tho
statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's a cyberdefense center both selection. estonia is the most connected country in europe. they are a leader in the government. that's when of the reasons why estonia is super interesting. i don't know how much my time -- am i good? >> you are good. >> i'm going to spend a couple minor on other ones. okay, so there's lots of incidents in my side of e-mail, targeted attacks to u.s. satellites. it looks like someone from china. i'm not saying chinese government, but someone through china for mr. cheney servers appear to have been doing the proof of concept. they were trained to see whether they could get him into the
coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china
called a nuclear threat was a real problem. during those days, the cold war really focused on russia at the united states, the two powerhouses. fast forward, you have vietnam. vietnam is an adventure into itself in terms of north and south vietnam. many of you may have served. and you move fast forward and we're going to have russia, the berlin wall came down. we will have benefits of that -- of the peace dividend. it was multiple stands. pick a stand. it became a challenge in terms of stability of government resources and the data we knew about this particular companies. move on forward, 9/11 happened. everyone of you remember is where you were on 9/11. i was on the steps of the pentagon. i literally walked out of the building that day and i was there for meeting and remember hearing on that gorgeous blue day and absolute eerie sound. like a plane had taken a wrong turn. lo and behold, the next thing i knew i was on the bottom stairs and i am thinking, how did i get from the top to bottom of the stairs? the plane hit the building. i did not know in where i was sitting at that point
itself swimming in controversy over a proposed plan to import 18 more of them from russia. >> we feel like our role is not only to have animals so that people can be inspired by seeing them, but we also have to have them to learn from them. >> reporter: the whales all captured in the last seven years would be spread out over six aquariums in the u.s. the first such import in almost two decades. >> we want to ensure that that population is robust and can be maintained. and these belugas can be around for future generations to enjoy. >> this is about money. this is about ticket sales. >> reporter: dr. laurie marino, a neuroscientist at emory university, is among the thousands of people who criticize the plan during an online comment period. she also points out that a newborn beluga whale died at the georgia aquarium earlier this year. >> their lives are ruined in captivity. they will be in socially deprived situations. where their autonomy is taken away. >> reporter: the plan has drawn the attention of peta, and actress kim bassinger, who in a letter last month to the governor called th
, look, we have the leaders of france and britain and china and russia and the u.n. and we're trying to prevent nuclear weapons, you know, you should probably not meddle in this. that's a winnable argument. i think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right
. the legislative agenda this week includes discussion with trade of russia. live coverage of the house is here on c-span. also at 2:00 eastern live coverage of the senate as members resume consideration of a sportsman bill. off the floor this week members ofts congress will hold hearings on the terrorist in benghazi attack that killed leaders. and a meeting with president obama about fiscal issues. in a few moments a book tv event with paula brot we will. petraeus designed after an f.b.i. investigation uncovered an extramarital affair. then a forum with two med doll of honor recipients and the joint chiefs of staff retired general richard myers. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning t. new america foundation hosts a discussion on how going over the fiscal cliff would effect the military, social security and medicare. that's on c-span2 at 9:00 eastern. at 10:00 eastern on c-span 3 looks at al qaeda groups in yemen. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president through a short video let the president know what's the most important issue he shoul
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
korea, north korea, russia and japan all have leadership succession or elections during that year. it inevitably makes the top leaders focused inward on leadership issues, very unwilling to appear to be in any way weak abroad and so forth. 2013 is the opposite. you would expect the new leaders knowing they have to deal with each other for years to come potentially have a more positive agenda looking forward. how do we build something that's not going to impose high costs is and have few benefits? every one of those leaders has enormous domestic problems that they have to confront, and they want some more space to pursue that. so i think there's an underlying, you know, the kind of underlying tectonic plates are moving at a somewhat different direction in 2013. obviously, specific events can throw that out of whack, and if you look at the details, they're pretty tough. on xi personally, you know, he has evinced some, you know, he has some exposure to the u.s., he seems to enjoy being here when he's been here, he has good relations with vice president biden and so forth. he seems to
. >> right. >> we should worry as a country when we are a punch line for russia. when russia looks at our democracy and says, wow, that's inefficient, wow, that has a lot of flaws. we're supposed to be the best. we were the best in 1776. we've got to update. >> part of that updating means now we all -- all have computerized databases statewide. >> right. that was part of the help america vote mandate act. >> that is right y. is it if you move from one county to another, if you don't reregister you're not in the system. >> it drives me nuts. it's like everybody in my world, like my friends, the post office, bill collectors. >> they can find you. >> magazine subscribers, they all know where i am. how does the voting system not. >> be very clear. we as an association have a 50 state database of every voter. >> you can purchase access to that. >> the same database that the folks who send you those catalogs use. >> exactly. >> so the federal government can use it and fix it like that. >> that's right. but the federal government won't. >> explain to us. >> because our infrastructure is based on
. french authorities have launched a murder probe. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible polonium concentration. the exhumation process will only take a few hours. the samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it is unclear when first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yasser arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says, because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals, and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course i am against it, he says, it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused i ed israel of being be any poisoning of arafat, a claim the government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if polonium can
, it has 2 million views, 400,000 likes and 28,000 comments and passed from romania to russia to china. and the officer himself came forward. he is lawrence deprimo, an unfailingly polite 25-year-old who still lives with his mom and dad. >> so i went up to him and i was like, buddy, where's your socks, where's your shoes? he said, i never had a pair of socks or shoes, officer, but god bless you. i knew right then i needed to help him. >> reporter: when you presented him with the boots what was his reaction? >> he couldn't believe it. he was this is too much officer. god bless you, be safe, everything. like i said, almost like you gave him $1 million. >> reporter: officer deprimo doesn't know anything about the man he helped or what's become of him, but he keeps the receipt for the $75 he spent on the boots in his bulletproof vest, a reminder for all of us about the pervasiveness of need and potential for compassion. dan harris, abc new, new york. >> just a pure act of kindness. >> and he heard -- just before he got the boots, he heard someone chuckle at the homeless guy on the street.
in power and maintain control over at least part of syria and that of course is russia and iran and the result would be al-assad steven pour and the victory which is not going to be good for our simultaneous efforts to try to move iran to the negotiating table to seize the nuclear weapons, and in white portions of syria, a no-man's land rather like the fata of somalia where the militants perhaps probably associated with al qaeda would find a new home. we already see some of this. this is another reason why the administration needs to engage in putting in beijing through military means if necessary the merkley or indirectly through providing weapons and things like no-fly zones. we need to do more and we need to do more urgently or this is great to slip out of control. at best -- and it isn't very good at sifry at salles -- at worst we are going to see any emerging sunni shia fisher across the middle east would be followed by violence and fighting in iraq and elsewhere. let me touch on iraq. it hasn't received too much commentary either in the debates in the campaign or even some
this week at a zoo in russia. unfortunately, their birth mother abandoned them, so this shepherd dog stepped in to nurse the little cubs. it's not been the first time the tiger mom refused to feed her babies. it happened five months ago when she gave birth to two cubs. the zoo staff was prepared this time, brought in the dog to help, and the little cubs, well, they are happy campers. arthel: i mean, as if pictures weren't enough, the vocals just kill me. i love it so much. very nice. jon: yeah, that's mom. mom doesn't look too happy, but the cubs are happy. arthel: tsa why we love dogs -- that's why we love dogs. thanks for having me. jon: it's been fun having you here today. i guess now we have to go shopping, right? arthel: yes, we do, and what are we eating? grass-fed beef. jon: see you later on the fox report, 7 p.m. eastern tonight. thank you for joining us. arthel: "america live" starts right now. rick: and we begin with a fox
. that guy steps in and somehow -- oh. the gold medal goes to russia there. >> it didn't look like he put in any effort. >> that's a trarl for the next "x-men" movie. >> that was impressive. so is "pop news." >> thank you, george. >>> we begin with the the muppets and cee lo green. they've teamed up for an album, cee lo's magic moment. the new video, all i need is love. ♪ all i need is love ♪ oh yeah all i need is love ♪ yeah >> it sounds familiar. a little bit of a mashup. love the ma na ma na. >>> the muppets will be here to perform for us tomorrow and be special guests throughout the show. >> ce rks -- cee lo has a muppet-like quality. >>> prince william and his wife visited a rugby game over the weekend. he noticed he had signed it 17 years ago along with his mom, the late princess diana. it was a special moment for the couple and a handwriting remirnd that william's handwriting was much better at 12 than in the recent post. who could take a lesson from them? the biebs. >>> south korean rapper psy is riding that imaginary pony right into the recordbooks. his video is the most v
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
to see the u.n. become a global government, and the u.n. and china and russia which are not yet democratic country. they have veto power on the security council and the general assembly is controlled by nations, despotism, and either we defend it as reagan said or it goes away. and freedom is not the birth right of every human being without everybody fighting for it. >> well put. >> that's an exceptional interview. thank you for hauling yourself out of bed early on that sunday morning. what do you think about that, e-mail us. and the industry is thriving and all because of what they're doing below the surface of the earth. what is the future of american fuel, green or gas? then mitt romney shares a personal story that brings a crowd of 17,000 to its feet, gave goose bumps. how an american flag and a scout leader are making headlines. who is that guy who just absoluted? what's that flag? we're going to tell you. ♪ [ lisa ] my name's lisa, and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, c
have serious and continuing differences with russia -- on syria, missile defense, nato enlargement, a human-rights, and other issues. so we have to take a smart and balanced approach going forward. we need to continue expanding our engagement with russia, but with very clear rise about where we draw our lines. we also have to engage with a set of the emerging democratic powers like brazil and mexico, india and indonesia, south africa and turkey, that are exercising greater influence in their region and on the world stage. the strategic fundamentals of these relationships, shared democratic values, common economic and security priorities, are pushing our interests and do closer convergence. this is reflected in the broad strategic dialogue we have launched with the emerging powers. the key going forward will be to encourage them to leave behind the outdated politics of the past and take up the responsibilities that come with global influence, including defending our shared democratic values beyond their borders. let me turn to the third element of our agenda, what i call economic st
the bomb on russia, which is a huge problem. so peter sellers in this movie playing numerous roles as he always does, he has to kind of coral all of these people in the government and try to stop this, the crazy war that's going to happen just randomly on one day. and this movie just keeps getting better with age because, you know, lines never stop being funny, as our world gets more and more ridiculous in real life. like george c. scott and the russian ambassador are fighting and peter sellers has to break it up by saying, you can't fight in here. this is the war room. >> i love it. >> and it's a classic. 1964. you are reaching back. not to confuse it with "dr. no." you start thinking about james bond movies, especially since we have been engamed in so much bond stuff with the release of the double-box set, but "dr. strangelove" a classic, a stand out in and of itself and your number one. >> yes, and thanks to my dad who showed this to me as a young age and taught me not to fight in the war room and show people the big boards. important lessons. >> thanks so much. always good to see you
poor. we have seen this in russia, china, east germany -- i mean, nobody is healthy. everybody is equally miserable everybody has to understand, let's not tax the wealthy so much, and pretty soon you will not have wealthy people any more, and everybody is not going to advance and our society will be poorer for it. host: that is joe in gaithersburg, maryland, in the suburbs of washington, d.c.. one of the races watch was in massachusetts. elizabeth warren gave her speech last night. [video clip] [applause] >> you did everything that everyone thought was impossible, he taught a scrappy, first-time candidate how to get in the ring and win. [applause] you took on the powerful wall street banks and special interests, and you let them tell you what a senator that will be out there fighting for the middle class all of the time. [applause] and despite the odds, you elected the first woman senator. [applause] i want to close by noting that it was exactly 50 years ago tonight that senator. kennedy was first elected to the united states -- ted kennedy was first elected to the united state
in a stone in 2007 during a dispute with russia -- estonia, and various banks and government institutions in estonia were hit with denial of service attacks. just to say, attacks that kept those institutions from at least running on the internet, capped their websites working, maybe disrupted their operations one way or another the interestingly in response to the estonia events, nato established a cybersecurity center of excellence in estonia in 2008, and they've been studying this from nader's perspective from a law of war perspective since then. recently published a very comprehensive treatise on the subject of law of war and cyber warfare. you see the same thing in georgia. press accounts suggesting that the russian government was behind cyberattacks that occurred contemporaneously prior to land forces going into georgia in 2008. and there are other examples like this, and is one of the panelists mentioned, as john mentioned in his introduction, even secretary panetta recently gave a speech, and according to press accounts officials at dod have suggested that iran has been behind a nu
be highly desirable to find a way to bring russia to work out a deal for us to say no, no, no i just want to make the point that as wonderful as all the modern tools are they will not allow us to just tools to consult the situations and i think the moment is here. it is over dewey and extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing and syria not only because of israel and other countries in the region but because it sets a - example to other bad guys in the region and elsewhere who will be encouraged that they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act so this is a huge challenge we have to face even is not a military solution, it is a smart diplomacy. >> we have to wrap up pretty soon but let me take two more comments from here and there. yes. >> thank you very much. my name is luis. i'm afraid i'm standing in for life defense secretary. i just want to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic practitioner particularly in my part of the world in the china, asia, jakarta, they have some good news which i would like to throw in. there
with the russians on making sure their interests are addressed in syria. i do not think russia is wedded to assad. may be establishing a no-fly zone from turkey, may be providing direct military assistance, but something to break the region's debt lot. syria cannot afford for a long time much of the destruction that it is undertaking. my last point has to do with peace. rob cover this up. i have said this for awhile and i will say it again, very and diplomatically, it is peace now or never. i understand all the difficulties that the u.s. president will face in trying to bring this to conflict resolution. i understand the priority of this issue is not in terms of other u.s. priorities domestically. i understand the president is facing hard-line israeli government not interested in my view in 8 two-state solution that is viable, a week palestinian government that does not have what it takes to come to an arrangement. i understand all this. i also understand if something drastic is not done today, we will lose this opportunity probably forever. one has to choose between the difficult and the impossi
that could drag nato into the war, russia warned. >> translator: as i already said, the main concern is that the more weapons there are, the greater the risk that they will be used. and also any provocation could trigger it. >> reporter: winter will be unkind to the regime and its opponents. more refugees will struggle in freezing temperatures. but worse weather will also make it harder for the regime's main advantage, air power to fly. the hardest month for syrians may still be ahead. joe, i should point out what we've just seen in the report many people most traveling the intense shelling of these damascus suburbs namely there it seems to be that the regime is unable to push into these rebel strongholds there and is resorting to this heavy bombardment. but i'm sure there are people in the inner circle around president bashar al assad perhaps feeling nervous tonight. joe. >> nick paton walsh in beirut. >>> some charities are worried they might need their own lifeline with the country on the brink of a fiscal cliff. that's next. and actually share . ♪ the lexus december to remember
about going to war with russia. he had -- he had a lot of ingredients to him. larry hagman was not just the star of "dallas." >> i think people forget about that, and sadly, this is the kind of moment when people are reminded how powerful a person or how far-reaching they are, sadly at their passing. you talk about how he was a big advth of trying to kick the habit, trying to get you to kick the habit. he tried to help so many others. you forget about the "i dream of genie." he was in "nixon" as well as well as playing j.r., which was the big iconic character that i think everyone really remembers. i think most people think he kind of embodied j.r. how different from j.r. was he, since you knew him? >> he was very different, fredricka. another thing about him, he was intense. on the smoking thing, when -- he had the day, my birthday many years ago, he called me. i didn't smoke all that day, and he would call me every half hour. i was in washington. he was in l.a. he was persistent. he would go around with a little fan, a little fan, if you smoked, he blew the fan at you. >> to try to bl
, are at stake here. and that's why this is so difficult for us. >> and -- >> -- like russia. and interesting timing for all of this, right, between this and ehud barak's, interesting to watch. jamie rubin always nice to have you with us. coming up at the top of the hour we're going to talk more about what's happening in the middle east with dr. hanan ashrawi of the palestinian liberation organization. >>> still ahead on "starting point," you know all that confetti that was raining down on thanksgiving day parades. wasn't that fabulous? well, actually, it was very sensitive information. oops. social security numbers, things like that. >>> also, the man who played one of the most beloved characters in movie history, peter billingsley, ravel if i, ta ral, talks about the new musical. we're back in just a moment. ti . because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your pur
finds itself swimming in controversy over a proposed plan to import 18 more of them from russia. >> we feel like our role is not only to have animals so that people can get inspired but to learn from them. >> reporter: the whales all captured in the last seven years would be spread out over six aquariums in the u.s. the first such import in almost two decades. >> we want to ensure that population is robust and can be maintained. and these belugas can be around for future generations to enjoy. >> this is about money. this is about ticket sales. >> reporter: a neuroscientist at emery university is among the thousands of people who have criticized the plan during an online comment period. she also points out that a newborn beluga whale died at the georgia aquarium earlier this year. >> their lives have ruined in captivity. they will be in a socially deprived situation where their autonomy is taken away. >> reporter: the plan has drawn the attention of peta and kim basinger who called the idea extremely cruel. but officials at the aquarium claim those critics are a vocal minority. the proo
the obvious higher priorities, iran, the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia, and so forth. i would imagine considerably lower priority. >> did cuba policy wax and wean with each new administration? >> it did. it did. the most ferocious opposition was in the kennedy years. jack kennedy, as i said, was really determined to do something about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. hue millñhr -- huh mill -- humiliated by castro in the bay of pigs. kennedy's obsession was vietnam so cuba declined precipitously. presidents like ford, carter, made very serious efforts to achieve that with fidel castro, the opposite of what kennedy was doing, and so, yes, cuba maxed and waned. a different kind of priority over the 50 years for 10 or 11 american presidents. >> on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets? did cuba have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president? >> i don't think castro ever had a direct hand in an assassination plot against an american president, but i describe in the book some of the most startling information i acquired from cuba
combined mpg c-max hybrid. >> steve: quick headlines. nuclear powered submarine from russia coming within 200 miles of the united states in the atlantic. navy officials tell fox news of it not a provocative act and the u.s. detected the sub. that's good to know. today voters could make washington state the first state to legalize the sale and use of recreational marijuana, like alcohol. you would have to be over 21 to buy it. if it pass, the federal government would have the ability to challenge it legality. look for that. gretch, over to you. >> gretchen: back if 2008, they were all about hope and change when they voted for president obama. but four years later, they're now looking for change. frank luntz sat down with a group of ex-obama vote increase ohio and asked them why they're changing their vote and he joins me now. good morning to you, frank. >> good morning. that was a day where we had five different swing states, ohio, pennsylvania, virginia, florida, wisconsin. of all the places i visited, that in ohio, when we talked to those ex-obama voters, it was emotional as they talked
in early 1945. the war is winding down. russia has beaten back germany and crippled them in stalin grad, places like that. what long-term effect, shor short-term effect, did roosevelt's weakness/illness in it dealing with stalin have on all of this? >> it had an enormous effect. one of the things you see when you read the transcripts, this part of the world was not of much interest to roosevelt at that point. he was interested in the u.n. that he was trying to set up, interested in the war in japan and one interesting moment where he said there's one polish city that this been polish before the war. they were arguing about the borders. maybe you should leave it in poland. he says to stalin, let's leave it in polllanpoland. stalin seems to agree. and thus to the fates of millions of people get decided and this is now in ukraine. but it was a kind of lack of interest, lack of focus in the last meetings of roosevelt and stalin. >> a seemingly crass question that i always ask historians when they're on the show. people do these books about topics that have been written by academics for a lo
russia been here for 20 years. those are, quote. sick people that were planning to go ahead with this marathon even though they cancelled it people were furious that they were ever considering it. more in the next hour including someone who lost their home. guys back to you. >> dave briggs, thanks so much for that report. being at the heart of it. >> brian: knicks did played last night packed house. brooklyn put on on thursday. the knicks played unbelievable. the crowd seemed great. i was in dave and busters yesterday as well as the marriott. >> steve: because it was warm. >> brian: it was packed. they were happy for the distraction i believe because there were a lot of people there that didn't look like basketball fans. >> steve: needed something to cheer for and they got it. >> gretchen: now for your headlines. president obama ordering the military to send fuel to new york in the wake of hurricane sandy. gas shortages have sparked insanely long lines and left people panicked. gas will be rationed starting today at noon. people with license plates ending in odd number will
considerably. as you can see, there is a lot of over russia there in recent years. i also want to focus on the total number of political appointees and appointments available to each president. these are the main categories. presidential appointment with consent at the set, about 800 people, they are at the top of the executive branch, these are constitutionally established offices of the united states. each one of them is created by a congressional statute. non-career senior executive service. it has about 8000 career people, but 10% of those means nonpolitical appointees. it is a bridge gaps between the top-level executive and the next layer is of mid-level management. the next category are level 1- 15, it means general schedule. these were created in 1953. republicans were so starved of getting offices, eisenhower did not approve of patronage and did not want anything to do with a, but the pressure from the republican party was so great that they brought patronage into the white house and created in schedules c positions lower at the bureaucracy. at that time, there were about 200 of
of the palestinians' legendary leader. specimens will then be taken to lack labs in russia, france, and switzerland to try to solve the enduring mystery of his death. was yasser arafat murdered? hidden behind the wall of blue tarpaulin investigators exhume the the body of yasser arafat this morning. he was buried in a frenzy of grief eight years ago. at rest in this shrine in ramallah ever since. revered by his people as a freedom fighter, and reviled by others as a terrorist. the last time a frail arafat was seen in public, he flew for treatment to paris. there he died in his hospital bed. cause of dead, never made public. his wife kept the medical report private, and rumors flew. he died of aids. he was murdered, poisoned. >> each one of us want to know the truth. what killed yasser arafat? we're obsessed about this. >> reporter: it was object after a report by al jazeera tv this year that the pressure grew on arafat's wife to agree to exhume her husband's body. al jazeera claimed that arafat was poisoned with radioactive polonium 210. al jazeera reported the scientist in switzerland found high l
with disabilities act was adopted, we had people from many countries come here. i can think of both first russia, then it was greece, ireland, great britain, a number of other countries came here to learn what we had done and then to pick it up and move forward in their own countries. our legal framework influenced the substance of the convention and is informing its implementation in the 125 countries, i think, that has signed the -- that has ratified it along with the european union. my staff was involved in 2002 when the u.n. first broached this subject of coming up with a convention, and in turn provided to them the substance of the americans with disabilities act, its history, its provisions and what had been done from its adoption in 1990 until 2002, and the changes that it had brought about in our own country. so really, the americans with disabilities act really informed and laid the basis for what the u.n. began to do in 2002 and completed in 2006. so again, i'm very grateful to the leadership of senator kerry, senator mccain, also senator dole who i know is -- is not able to be with us
innovators, serge jay brinn, born in russia, co-founder of google in my county, that employs thousands and thousands of americans. he didn't come here because of his degree. he came with his parents. jerry yang, founder of yahoo, grew up in east san jose he didn't come because he got admitted to stanford he came with his family. andy grove, a legend at intel, didn't come because of his degree, he came as a refugee. i'm reminded of my grandfather and what he brought that country. at age 16, he got on a boat, he never saw his parents again. he never got a degree. i he came to america because he wanted to be free. he worked hard all his life. i was the first one, i went to stanford university, i was the first in my family to go to college. but i was -- i'm here today in congress because my grandfather, without an education, but with a lot of heart, with enough get up and go to get up and go came to become an american. i am sure that if you examined the history of so many members of congress you would find in their family tree people who had enough get up and go to come to the united state
. >> that is something i'd expect maybe in china. or russia. but not united states. that is common sense you don't have, your president behind the polling. >> deputy secretary of the commonwealth shannon royer told fox news, "it's an absolute disgrace. election materials and election nearing inside the polling place are prohibited by state law. this can been interpreted as trying to influence voters inside the polling place. also in philadelphia, one member of the new black panthers party was back. in 2008, another carried a nightstick. but democratic poll watcher stood silently as we tried to get him to talk. >> have you been around a lot today? [ no response ] what is your purpose of being here? >> one election protection group reports receiving 40,000 cause of complaints nationwide. in ohio, these lawyers were handling frauds in the cuyahoga county board of elections where the officials vowed to watch for fraud. >> we ensure that all of our focus son all the details -- focus is on all the details. all the "i"s dotted and "t"s crossed. >> that is eric shawn in cleveland. >> megyn: as we wait for the
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